Human Performance and Rehabilitation Centers, Inc.

Front of knee pain: How to treat Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

If you’ve experienced pain in the front of your knee around the kneecap, it’s probably a condition called Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome. Known also as “runner’s knee” or “jumper’s knee,” this condition can occur at any age, but it’s most common in teenagers, young adults, athletes and those who have recently hit puberty.

Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome is typically not caused by trauma; instead, it can seem to just appear. Because no single incident is the culprit, a person experiencing it may be inclined to work through the pain, or keep participating in sports or activities. When the pain doesn’t resolve, and, in fact, it gets worse, everyday knee flexion and extension can become intolerable.

Younger athletes are particularly vulnerable to Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome. During puberty, a young person’s bones grow fast –  outpacing the growth rate of ligaments, tendons and muscles and putting more stress on the joints. In addition, females have wider hips compared to their male counterparts and this can change the alignment of the knee and impact the patella’s movement in the trochlear groove. Athletes who engage in running, soccer, volleyball, cheerleading and dancing could experience this kind of knee pain.

Other causes for Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome include muscle weakness, stiffness, fatigue, improper shoe wear and poor movement patterns. Other contributing factors include overtraining or poor training techniques. And, prolonged sitting behind a desk during the week coupled with extreme “weekend warrior” activities can create an opening for Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome.

Patients should avoid irritable activities and apply ice two-to-three times daily to decrease inflammation. Physical therapy plays a big part in getting back to normal. In PT sessions, we work with patients on improving flexibility, stretching the hamstrings and strengthening the quads and hips by using very specific exercises. I usually like to see patients with this condition twice a week for four to six weeks.

Because of the multitude of contributing factors for each individual experiencing Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome, it’s important to let an experienced PT evaluate your case and develop a therapy plan that fits.