Human Performance and Rehabilitation Centers, Inc.

Sit Up Straight: How Workplace Posture Impacts Health

For a growing number of professionals, the cumulative effects of working behind a desk can take their toll. Years of pecking away at a computer and talking on the phone can lead to a variety of issues, including headaches, stiffness, and pain in the shoulders, middle back and neck. There’s hope, though. These issues can be effectively addressed through physical therapy and by making adjustments to your everyday posture.

We see patients routinely who experience pain that we can link directly to the way they sit at work. The modern world has created all sorts of demands that don’t square with our bodies’ natural movements. We are not designed to perch in uncomfortable chairs six to eight hours a day, and as the years go by, our body rebels by expressing pain. Physical therapists address these issues by using interventions that can effectively remove stiffness. We also help patients strengthen muscles in the upper back to provide additional support to the neck and shoulders. And, we make specific recommendations for postural adjustments so that pain does not return.

Improving the way you sit at a desk goes a long way. Here are some recommendations:

  • Your feet should touch the floor completely. For people under 5’5”, this can be a challenge as most desks are made for taller people. Use a box or stool if needed.
  • You should be able to place your forearm on your desk or your elbows on arm rests while typing at a keyboard.
  • Your knees should be at a 90-degree angle when you sit, making sure your knees are in line with your hips.
  • Don’t crane your neck to talk on the phone. Use a headset.
  • Ideally, your computer screen should be at eye level.

One of the most important issues to remember is that the body doesn’t like being stagnant. Set a timer and take a “micro-break” every 20 minutes. I can hear the work-a-haulics groaning, but this doesn’t have to take long – a mere 10-15 seconds is all that’s required to stand up and stretch. It’s a simple strategy that goes a long way in protecting your health and warding off pain.

Treating Achilles Tendonitis

Overview of Achilles tendonitis

Achilles tendonitis is a condition in which the Achilles tendon becomes painful or inflamed because of overuse. It’s often experienced by runners who make an abrupt change in their routine, such as an increase in mileage, hills or speed work without building up adequately. Weekend athletes who are sedentary during the week can also experience the condition. It’s easy to assume that Achilles tendonitis will improve on its own, but that’s usually not the case. Untreated, it almost always gets worse.

How to recognize Achilles tendonitis

Achilles tendonitis comes on slowly. Overuse causes the tendon to become tight and inflamed. Pain and swelling can occur anywhere along the Achilles tendon, which spans from the heel bone to the calf. When the condition first appears, the patient might notice some discomfort above the heel when running, walking, getting out of bed or standing for long periods. The pain and stiffness will usually worsen over time.

How physical therapy can help

Reducing inflammation in the Achilles tendon is the main goal of therapy. Depending on the patient’s level of mobility, treatment can include modalities like therapeutic ultrasound, dry needling and Astym. These modalities reduce inflammation and decrease the chances of the tendonitis from returning.

  • Therapeutic ultrasound is a highly effective treatment for Achilles tendonitis. It is used in conjunction with an anti-inflammatory gel applied to the surface of the skin. The ultrasonic waves help the gel to penetrate the tissue faster and bring relief to the inflamed area.
  • Dry needling is a form of manual therapy in which small needles are inserted into “knots” or trigger points. In Achilles tendonitis patients, it is used to address the referred pain that a patient can experience in the calf muscles. Dry needles are applied in a relatively painless manner and coax the muscle to release tension and “reset.”
  • Astym is a soft tissue therapy in which a clinician performs certain protocols of manual therapy using a small hard plastic instrument. This is an effective strategy for breaking down scar tissue and stimulating the growth of healthy soft tissue.

Patients with Achilles tendonitis usually see good results between 8-12 weeks.